Top reviews: “399 Games, Puzzles & Trivia Challenges Specially Designed to Keep Your Brain Young”

Top reviews: “399 Games, Puzzles & Trivia Challenges Specially Designed to Keep Your Brain Young”

Cross-train your brain. All it takes is ten to fifteen minutes a day of playing the right games. (It’s fun.)

Exercising your brain is like exercising your body—with the right program, you can keep your brain young, strong, agile, and adaptable. Organized on an increasing scale of difficulty from “Warm-up” to “Merciless,” here are 399 puzzles, trivia quizzes, brainteasers, and word game that are both fun and engaging to play, and are expertly designed to give your brain the kind of workout that stimulates neurogenesis, the process of rejuvenating the brain by growing new brain cells.

Target Six Key Cognitive Functions:

1. Long-Term Memory. 2. Working Memory. 3. Executive Functioning. 4. Attention to Detail. 5. Multitasking. 6. Processing Speed.

repair your brain, improve your brain, heal your brain, brain healthy, younger brain
long-term memory, short-term memory, executive functioning, mutlitasking, processing speed
word games, word puzzlesattention to detailbrain exercise

Top reviews


We highly recommend half of this book. It’s full of challenges that are accessible by almost anyone, and there’s a lot of variety. For instance, you might be given two different word definitions & have to name a homonym set that fits. Or you might be tasked with listing 26 different color names, one for each letter of the alphabet. Or come up with a list of words that begin with the prefix “ant-” based on various clues. We find these types of puzzles both challenging & genuinely fun. And for most of them, they’re the types of challenges that you can read aloud to a group–or to a significant other–to enjoyably while away a long road trip.
But then there’s the other half of the book. That’s the half filled with some of the most useless trivia from long gone eras. You might be asked about a wealthy socialite from the 1920s, or a slightly famous murder trial that took place during the Great Depression. Occasionally there are questions from the 1990s or–even more rarely–from the 2000s. But these are few & far between. For the most part, you’ll get a lot of questions that you’re really only likely to know if you lived during the early-to-mid 20th century.
In retrospect, the cover text is very revealing: the book claims these puzzles were designed to “keep your brain young.” That makes sense if it was written with an an older audience in mind.
Bottom line: if you were born in the 1940s and enjoy word puzzles & trivia, it’s a no-brainer to buy this book–you’ll probably enjoy every page. If you were born in the 1970s, you’re going to struggle a lot but you’ll still get a lot out of it. And if you were born in the 1990s or later: enjoy the word challenges, but prepare to skip many, many pages & roll your eyes a lot.


Book arrived in perfect condition. I am finding the puzzles, games and trivia quite fun, some a tad difficult but all interesting (I’m not what the younger reviewers consider “old” either) If you feel you are too young to know the answers; research, broaden your horizons, learn about the past, after all, it repeats itself often. Someone commented on “outdated trivia”; it can be referred to as past culture and history; learn something old, you may learn something new! If you feel the book is too simplistic, wow, good for you, you might want to look in to going on Jeopardy (not being sarcastic actually). Some reviewers gave low star reviews due to the fact they themselves spoke “broken English”. The book is written in English, often utilizing words containing two or more syllables; so, if you don’t understand the words 1. look them up in the English Dictionary and/or 2. Cross reference the English language words, which you don’t understand, to your home lands’ language; you may learn a few new words which is a positive thing. The book can actually be a fun tool if you don’t know the American culture, you might just have to look up the answers more than others, not a problem, it’s called learning . If you find some of the puzzles difficult, play with your kids, spouse, friends, etc., making it a fun, learning experience (and if you all get too frustrated, just peek in the back of the book and say “DUH, I knew that!”) For those who are drastically challenged in memory, this book may be a bit too difficult and frustrating; as for me, I struggle with some of the “timed” challenges, but rather than getting frustrated with myself, I simply try to answer the best I can on my own time, hoping that maybe my mind will catch up as I practice the puzzles. I’m grateful for this book, much better for me than watching nothing on television or staring at my cell phone all day long. Finally, for those who only know “newer trivia”, write your own book, after all the “old” saying goes “necessity is the mother of invention”. (Just a little trivia for you).



Top reviews: “399 Games, Puzzles & Trivia Challenges Specially Designed to Keep Your Brain Young”